Monthly Archives: June 2010

Copyright as an instrument of industrial policy

As Russell McOrmond says, “A great post by David Eaves about the myth that Bill C-32 supports market forces.” I’d go farther: Eaves is actually pointing out that copyright itself doesn’t support market forces: I too believe that consumers should … Continue reading

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"Radical extremists" and the smearing of Michael Geist

Note: I actually wrote most of this early last week, but never got around to posting it, what with the dissertation and all. Too bad, since in light of Heritage Minister James Moore’s recent comments about the opponents of Bill … Continue reading

Posted in Bill C-32, common decency | 6 Comments

Bill C-32: Copyright debate turns ugly. Again.

And here I was hoping that we could debate Bill C-32 rationally, if not calmly. Instead, we have our Minister of Canadian Heritage characterizing critics of Bill C-32 as: “Those absolutists out there, who are babyish in their approach to … Continue reading

Posted in Bill C-32, common decency | 2 Comments

Access to Information by the Numbers

Following up on a previous post: Number of days it took to fulfill my request for information from the Privy Council Office for “records related to copyright law reform,” between June 1, 2005, and the date of the request (December … Continue reading

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No good deed goes unpunished

Personally, if someone explained to me that they were late in replying to an offer of admission to a Masters program because, “I’m in rural Tanzania teaching kids to read and my Internet access is a bit spotty,” I’d give … Continue reading

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Canadian copyright: Room to maneuver?

As I mentioned in my previous post, on Thursday I presented a paper – essentially my dissertation’s argument compressed into 25 pages – at the Canadian Political Science Association’s annual conference. Great, insightful comments from our discussant, York University Professor … Continue reading

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Shameless self-promotion and the future of journalism

As you may have heard, yesterday I presented a paper on North American digital copyright policy at the Canadian Political Science Association annual conference. It’s nice to be noticed, but boo to the NDP: the quote about the Americans deals … Continue reading

Posted in CPSA paper, future of journalism | Leave a comment